Walk at Treflevenez

The name of the village, Tréflevénez, is derived from ‘tref’ meaning ‘place’ and ‘levenez’ meaning ‘joy’ and it is suggested that the origin of the village dates back to the Crusades.

The walk is easy to follow on a map, but it is also available online – details at the end of the post. The route followed the usual tracks, lanes, sunken roads with wide views as well, and at the end you can visit another of the parish enclosures.

The area was controlled by the Manor of Kerézellec

The old Manor of Kerezellec

The old Manor of Kerezellec

A 20C red cross

A 20C red cross

A chemin creux, or green, sunken lane

A chemin creux, or green, sunken lane

The monts d'arrees in the distance

The Monts d’Arrees in the distance

The Church of St Peter in Tréflévenez was originally built in the 15C, enlarged in the 16C, and further changed in the 17C. The sacristy was added in the 18C. There is no Triumphal Arch in the walls and only a façade of the Ossuary remains, built into a house. And yes, this is one of the parish enclosures.

The Church of St Pierre in Treflevenez

The Church or St Peter at Treflevenez

The Church of St Peter at Treflevenez

The church has some interesting, and unexpected, wall paintings. The 17C paintings in a side chapel were discovered when an altar piece was removed, and the Via Crucisfifteen stations of the Cross, was painted in 2005 by a Romanian artist, Valentin Scarlatescu, who also repainted the stringbeams

17C wall paintings

17C wall paintings

Two panels from the Stations of the Cross

Two panels from the Stations of the Cross

This is a good walk and an interesting church – to be recommended, and revisited!

Further information
Walk around Tréflévenez as above
The stained glass windows in more detail
The Pardon of St Pierre