Walk from Mougau Bihan

We parked in the car park next to the megalithic structure at Mougau Bihan and set off down the road – no guidance from Wendy Mewes this time – we just used the map.

We set off down this quiet road and soon turned left down ‘English’ green lanes.

The road past Mougau Bihan

The road past Mougau Bihan

Croas Melar is a granite cross which commemorates the site of a battle: in 1171 the Duke of Brittany, Conan IV, and his English allies defeated the Viscount of Léon, Guyomarch IV. The history of Brittany up to the Middle Ages is incredibly complicated, and violent, and I can recommend Wendy Mewes’ Discovering the History of Brittany as a succinct and clear guide.

Croas Melar

Croas Melar

At a crossroads the path continues uphill to the top of the hills, the Monts d’Arrees.

Cross roads

Cross Roads

The views are wide: here the line of trees marks the course of the Élorn River, close to its source.

In the Monts d'Arrees

In the Monts d’Arrees

In the Monts d'Arrees

In the Monts d’Arrees

In the Monts d'Arrees

In the Monts d’Arrees

In the Monts d'Arrees

In the Monts d’Arrees

So far it had been an easy walk, with a clear path, but that was about to change! I spotted a track on the map and we turned downhill. However, we were soon lost in thick bracken and gorse and a 15-minute saunter downhill turned into a 45-minute struggle. We could of course turned back….

Turning downhill towards Commana

Turning downhill towards Commana

The 'path' through bracken & gorse

The ‘path’ through bracken & gorse

Finally we found the track we were looking for – wide, clear, easy.

The track up to the Monts d'Arrees

The track up to the Monts d’Arrees

And so back to the car

You may be interested in
The Élorn River
Photograph of the Élorn River at La Roche Maurice in 1850s