Regent’s Canal Walk, No.8, from the Park to Grand Junction Basin

The canal runs along the northern edge of Regents Park, passing London Zoo about which Mr Bradshaw has a great deal to say in his Hand Book to London of 1862. I, however, feel uncomfortable about confining wild animals and so include only a rather vague photograph of the zoo and pass on.

The Macclesfield Bridge was named after Lord Macclesfield (George Parker, 4th Earl of Macclesfield and a Chairman of the Regent’s Canal Company), and is the northern entry to Regent’s Park.  It is also known as ‘Blowup Bridge’ because on 10 October 1874 the barge Tilbury, loaded with petrol and 5 tonnes of gunpowder and one of a train of six barges, caught fire and exploded under the bridge, destroying the bridge, killing the crew, and damaging houses in the area. It is the grandest bridge on the Canal, with fluted columns cast by the Coalbrookdale Company, and was rebuilt in the original design.

Macclesfield Bridge, Regent's Park
Macclesfield Bridge, Regent’s Park
Regent's Canal from the top of Macclesfield Bridge
Regent’s Canal from the top of Macclesfield Bridge

The final stretch of the canal alongside Regent’s Park is overlooked by grand mansions designed by Quinlan and Francis Terry LLP and built between 1988 and 2004, although in sympathy with Nash’s Classical architecture in the Park.

Regency Villa by Quinlan and Terry Francis
Regency Villa by Quinlan and Francis Terry

??????????????????????????????? The canal at Lisson Grove is very wide (and also known as the Marylebone Wide) and moorings are at 90° (nice photographs). Somehow I missed the Canal House, built for the Manager of the Canal in 1906.

The Canal House, Lisson Grove
The Canal House, Lisson Grove
Bloomfield Road
Blomfield Road

Warwick Avenue Bridge with its lockkeeper’s cottage (photograph here) is the final bridge before the canal opens into Brownings Pool or the Grand Junction Basin, the meeting point of the Regent’s Canal, the Grand Juntion Canal, and the Paddington spur of the Canal. Robert Browning lived in Warwick Cresent and it was he who referred to the area as ‘Little Venice’.

The bridge over the Grand Union Canal, out of the basin
The bridge over the Grand Union Canal, out of the basin
Houses on Warwick Avenue, overlooking Rembrandt Gardens and Brownings Pool
House on Warwick Avenue, overlooking Rembrandt Gardens and Brownings Pool

You may be interested in
Detailed history of the building of the Canal
Macclesfield Bridge Explosion (pictures)
The explosion – interesting post
Map of Little Venice
Rembrandt Gardens
And do read David Father’s ‘The Regent’s Canal

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s