Regent’s Canal Walk, No.5, Sturt’s Lock to Islington Tunnel

Regents canal 5

I was a gloomy day, but I set out! Sturt’s Lock, no.6, is named after Mr Sturt who was a landowner in this area, like Mr Acton, and Peter de Beauvoir who lived in Balmes House (eventually an asylum and the origin of ‘barmy’). (Good image of the house and the canal in 1830 here.) But who was Mr Sturt? I can find a ‘John Sturt’, engraver, who died in 1730 but as he died in poverty it is unlikely he was the landowner after whom the lock is named.

Sturt's Lock, no.6
Sturt’s Lock, no.6
Wharf at Sturt's Lock
Wharf at Sturt’s Lock

Wenlock Basin was dug in 1825 and privately owned. It used to be the site for the Wenlock Iron Works; now most of the buildings are converted to residential use.

Wenlock Basin
Wenlock Basin

The City Basin was very important to trade and the properity of the Grand Union Canal because it was closer to the City than the Paddington Basin. The Basin was privately owned but by the 1950s it was rundown and derelict. It was only in 2004 that regeneration began.

City Basin
City Basin
Thomas Shepherd print, 1828, showing the two locks at City road
Thomas Shepherd print, 1828, showing the two locks at City road

The final stretch before the Islington Tunnel.

Elegant houses in Vincent Terrace
Elegant houses in Vincent Terrace
Elegant houses in Vincent Terrace
Elegant houses in Vincent Terrace
Entrance of the Islington Tunnel
Entrance of the Islington Tunnel

But the canal was built for trade – look at this post to remind yourself of its original purpose.

Tug with barges on the Regent's Canal, late 1930s
Tug with barges on the Regent’s Canal, late 1930s

You may be interested in
Old 1970s negatives of the Regent’s Canal – amazing!
The Kingsland Basin Development
The Regent’s Canal – excellent article, with maps
The Canal, Limehouse to Islington
Regent’s Canal, Appraisal Report, excellent
The City Road Basin
The Grand Junction Canal – amazing site with photographs; do browse

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.