Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, Day 7, St Pancras New Church (no.41)

Well, if there was an ‘Old Church’ it follows there is a ‘New Church’. St Pancras New Church was completed in 1822, ‘..the exterior adapted from Greek models..’, i.e. a 19C Greek temple. It was built on the south side of the New Road (the Euston Road), facing Euston Square.

St Pancras New Church

St Pancras New Church

The church was built to serve the new population of Bloomsbury. The architects were William Inwood and his son, and at a cost of £76,680 it was the most expensive church since St Paul’s Cathedral. The church was designed to seat 2,500 and the size and expense reflect, I suggest, the affluent new population in the area.

The high altar end of St Pancras New Church

The high altar end of St Pancras New Church

The Inwoods were inspired by two Greek temples: the Erechtheion and the Tower of the Winds (the inspiration for the tower). This great post includes the photo below and explains the history of the Erechtheion and how the Ionic order of the columns has been copied. In St Pancras the architects seem to have attempted to reproduce the entire temple – columns, layout, and the caryatides.

The Erechtheum, Athens

The Erechtheion, Athens

Caryatides, north side of the church

Caryatides, north side of the church

One of the caryatides from a matching porch on the south side

One of the caryatides from a matching porch on the south side

Look at the detail on the building, and on the amazing red doors – does anyone know why the doors are red?

IMG_1413, no.2

The Tower of the Winds was an octagonal clock tower in Athens, and used as the model for the church spire.

The Tower of the Winds, Athens

The Tower of the Winds, Athens

The spire of St Pancras New Church

The spire of St Pancras New Church

And in the garden, the Archangel Michael, by Emily Young, in remembrance of those killed by a bomb on 7 July 2005

IMG_1411, no.2

You may also be interested in 

Excellent post on the Church, with photographs

Euston Square

Smith’s New Map of London c.1830

The Church

Urban Geology