Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, Day 7, Russell Square and Queen’s Square (No.39)

I explored this route twice, once on a sunny afternoon and once at the end of the day, so the photographs reflect the different light at these times.

Russell Square was part of a grand redevelopment plan by the Earls of Southampton, and then through marriage, the Dukes of Bedford. The 1st Earl of Southampton bought the Manor of Bloomsbury from the Crown in 1545, and in 1661 Charles II granted the family a licence to begin building Bloomsbury Square. According to this article Lord Southampton ‘..pioneered the system of development by hereditary landlords through speculative builders which brought the rest of Bloomsbury (and half of London) into being…’.

Francis, Duke of Bedford
Francis, Duke of Bedford
Russell Square, with statue of Duke of Bedford facing Bloomsbury Square
Russell Square, with statue of Duke of Bedford facing Bloomsbury Square
A relaxed Sunday afternoon in December
A relaxed Sunday afternoon in December

???????????????????????????????

People were lingering for coffee at the end of the day
People were lingering for coffee at the end of the day
The cabmen's shelter at the north-east of the square
The cabmen’s shelter at the north-east of the square

On the west side some of the original houses by James Burton remain, but those on the north and south were changed in the 19C. All the housing on the east was replaced by the Russell Hotel.

The west side of Russell Square
The west side of Russell Square
Italianate embellishment on the south side
Italianate embellishment on the south side

IMG_1274

IMG_1279

The Hotel Russell was designed by Charles Fitzroy Doll who apparently excelled in designing hotels and was inspired by a chateau in Paris for this building.

The Russell Hotel
The Russell Hotel

Queen’s Square is hidden behind busy Russell Street and was developed between 1708 and 1720, with the gardens laid out in 1716. The square was originally open to the north, as shown in the print below, with views of the hills. Like all these squares the land was privately owned (and remains so) and leased for residential developments for the aristocracy or the very wealthy. Dr Charles Burney and his daughter Fanny were residents and in 1776 she wrote of ‘..the ‘beautiful prospect’ from her Queen Square house ‘of the hills, ever verdant and smiling’. As people moved out of the centre of London the use changed and this became an area associated with medicine. (The National Hospital for Neurology, The Italian Hospital, and The Great Ormond Street Hospital which is just round the corner.)

Queen Square, 1787
Queen Square, 1787, looking northwards
Today, Queen's Square looking northwards
Today, Queen’s Square looking northwards
Queen Anne, at the north end of the gardens
Queen Anne, at the north end of the gardens
Queen Square, 1810, from the Wellcome Trust Library
Queen Square, 1810, from the Wellcome Trust Library

On the south of the square, the Italian Hospital, and the Mary Ward Centre, housed in buildings from early 1700s, but subsequently changed.

The Italian Hospital and the Mary Ward Centre
The Italian Hospital and the Mary Ward Centre
The crest of The Italian Hospital
The crest of The Italian Hospital

The buildings on the west date from 18C and 19C and retain some of the original character of the square. No.6 was originally built in 1713 but refaced later in the century, and houses the Art Workers Guild. 

IMG_1293

Two buildings are earlier than the square: the Church of St George the Martyr was built in 1706 and the pub, The Queen’s Larder dates from 1710. This church, and St George, Bloomsbury, shared a burial ground today called St George’s Gardens, on the northern side of Coram’s Fields. (Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath were married in this church in 1956.)

The Church of St George the Martyr, Queen's Square
The Church of St George the Martyr, Queen’s Square
St George's Gardens
St George’s Gardens
The Queen's Larder in the evening
The Queen’s Larder in the evening

There was apparently a reservoir under the square, fed by nearby (?) springs which led water via The Devil’s Conduit to Greyfriars Monastery in Newgate Street, a distance of 1.2 miles. A pump at the south of the square lends credence to this, and does this photograph of the 14C conduit head, and these photographs pinpoint the site as behind and below no.20 Queen’s Square until redevelopment in 2011.

Conduit head, no.20 Queen Square
Conduit head, no.20 Queen Square
Garden on the site of 20 Queen's Square
Garden on the site of 20 Queen’s Square
Pump at south end of Queen's Square
Pump at south end of Queen’s Square

(Good post on history and timeline for Russell Square here.)

You may also be interested in 

Medical London

London Gardens Online

History of Queen Square

The Devil’s Conduit (photographs)

London’s Water Supply and the New River

St George’s Gardens

8 comments

  1. There was a pub towards the Queen sq end of Great Ormond street called the Queens Head for most of the nineteenth century. How did a pub come to occupy this street?

    Like

      • Thanks Candy. It was I understand quite a smart street and I don’t think the pub was particularly upmarket. My ancestors seem to have started at the pub sometime before 1820 and lasted until around 1860. But the need for a watering hole was no doubt paramount!

        Like

    • Thank you – I am so pleased when people enjoy the postings. Mr Bradshaw has been very kind to me, an encouraging companion during a difficult time. Sadly we are coming to the end of our explorations of London, but I have a list of other Victorian guide books! And yes, I have not only heard of Hannah Glasse, but I have a copy of her cook book.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.