Fulham Palace

Fulham Palace was the Manor House of the Bishops of London from c.11C and their country residence until 1973. I visited about ten days ago. (Here is a list of all the Bishops of London.)

Fulham Palace, seen from the Walled Garden

Fulham Palace, seen from the Walled Garden

This marvellous map (not dated) from the official website gives the layout of the Palace very clearly, and the map of 1872 (just ten years after Mr Bradshaw) amazingly shows the Palace still in the countryside.

Map of Fulham Palace

Map of Fulham Palace (unknown date)

Fulham Palace in the countryside, 1872, from Mapco

Fulham Palace in the countryside, 1872, from Mapco

The oldest part of the Palace is the quadrangle built by Bishop Fitzjames (1506-22), with marvellous diamond-patterning in the brickwork.

The Fitzjames Quadrangle of Fulham Palace

The Fitzjames Quadrangle of Fulham Palace

Looking out of the Fitzjames Quadrangle

Looking out of the Fitzjames Quadrangle

The Chapel was added by Bishop Tait in 1866-67, and next to the Chapel is one of the unusual trees in the garden, a cork oak. Several of the Bishops were keen gardeners, introducing trees and plants to England for the first time.

The Chapel at Fulham Palace

The Chapel at Fulham Palace

The site of the Palace has been inhabited for a very long time. The Palace was originally surrounded by a moat (now looking more like a ditch), and this has been suggested as a Danish, or even Roman defence.

A print of c.1880 showing the moat of Fulham Palace

A print of c.1880 showing the moat of Fulham Palace

Black Walnut Tree, Fulham Palace

Black Walnut Tree, Fulham Palace

The oldest oak tree at Fulham Palace

The oldest oak tree at Fulham Palace

I was at Fulham Palace to see the Walled Garden.

The gateway into the Walled Garden, Fulham Palace

The gateway into the Walled Garden, Fulham Palace

The avenue of apple trees inside the Walled Garden, Fulham Palace

The avenue of apple trees inside the Walled Garden, Fulham Palace

The Knot Garden

The Knot Garden

Calamagrostis 'Karl Foerster' in the Knot Garden with Robinia Pseudoacacia 'Frisia' in the background

Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’ in the Knot Garden with Robinia Pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ in the background

The newly restored greenhouses in the Walled Garden

The newly restored greenhouses in the Walled Garden

Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica) and sedums

Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica) and sedums

One of the last zinnias

One of the last zinnias

The bees had a good year at Fulham Palace – apparently you can buy the honey in Fortnum & Mason, but only in very small quantities.

The bee hives in the Walled Garden

The bee hives in the Walled Garden

And then there is the Bishop’s Tree, which is rather unprepossessing until you take a closer look. It is a cedar tree which was cut down, and has been carved with figures of past Bishops of London.

The Bishop's Tree

The Bishop’s Tree

The Bishops' Tree

The Bishops’ Tree

With the light facing it was time to leave, walking through the Bishop’s Park, with the avenues of plain trees alongside the Thames. Stupidly I did not visit the parish church at the entrance to Bishop’s Park.

The Thames at Fulham Palace

The Thames at Fulham Palace

Bishops' Park, Fulham Palace

Bishops’ Park, Fulham Palace

The Parish Church

The Parish Church

The gates into Bishop's Park

The gates into Bishop’s Park