Bradshaw’s Hand Book, The West, District III, between St James’s Street & Green Park (no.23)

As we walked through Green Park Mr Bradshaw mentioned that ‘..the eastern side is bounded by many of the finest mansions of the nobility..’, so I set off to investigate and this map explains the area which occupied me.

The area between Green Park and St James's Street
The area between Green Park and St James’s Street

Stafford House, (mentioned by Mr Bradshaw), the residence of the Sutherland family, started as York House, commissioned by the Duke of York in 1825. Unfinished at his death, it was sold to the 2nd Marquess of Stafford and eventually completed in 1841 for the 2nd Duke of Sutherland. It was sold in 1912 to Sir William Lever who named it after his county, and as Lancaster House it later passed into government control, and is now within St James’s Palace. (In a previous post; and the government used the money to buy Victoria Park.) ‘..Queen Victoria is said to have remarked to the Duchess of Sutherland on arriving at Stafford House, “I have come from my House to your Palace.”..’ .

Stafford House, now known as Lancaster House
Stafford House, now known as Lancaster House
The interior of Stafford House (Lancaster House)
The interior of Stafford House (Lancaster House)
Lancaster House, fireplace
Lancaster House, fireplace
Lancaster House, interior
Lancaster House, interior

Bridgewater House, in nearby Cleveland Row, was built for the Earl of Ellesmere, the second son of the 1st Duke of Sutherland, by Sir Charles Barry between 1845 and 1864. Sir Charles also laid out the garden, with raised walks, and this design is in place today. (Bridgewater House replaced Cleveland House, named after the Duchess of Cleveland, remembered in the nearby Cleveland Row.) Bridgewater House was known for its art collection which included the Orleans Collection, now held in the National Gallery of Scotland, with another group from the collection in the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. The house is now owned by the family of Yiannis Latsis.

Bridgewater House in St James' Place
Bridgewater House in St James’ Place
Bridgewater House, the frontage towards Green Park
Bridgewater House, the frontage towards Green Park
The garden of Bridgewater House
The garden of Bridgewater House

The site of ancestral home of the Dukes of Sutherland since the 14th century, the current Dunrobin Castle , and its gardens, were created by Sir Charles Barry. 

Dunrobin Castle
Dunrobin Castle
Dunrobin Castle gardens, laid out by Sir Charles Barry
Dunrobin Castle gardens, laid out by Sir Charles Barry

Spencer House , in St James’s Place, was built in 1756-58 for John, the 1st Earl Spencer. The architects were John Vardy the elder, and James Stuart, who decorated the first-floor rooms. The mansion set out to imitate Greek and Roman styles of architecture and decoration in an extremely impressive, grand, family mansion. The garden was laid out in 1795 and was the largest in St James’s. It was restored to the original plan in the 1990s, but is not currently open to the public, although guided tours (ticketed) of the house are available.

Spencer House from Green Park
Spencer House from Green Park
Spencer House from St James's Place
Spencer House from St James’s Place
Spencer House, The Great Room
Spencer House, The Great Room
Spencer House, The Grand Stair
Spencer House, The Grand Stair
Spencer House gardens as restored byTodd Longstaff-Gowan
Spencer House gardens , restored by Todd Longstaff-Gowan

The ancestral home of the Spencer family since the 16th century is Althorp.

Althorp House, the ancestral home of the Spencer family
Althorp House, the ancestral home of the Spencer family

I walked down Cleveland Row, ‘..the paragon of distinguished retiredness in the West End..’, according to Pevsner, to find these grand mansions. It is a ‘quaint’, narrow street abutting St James’ Palace, if I may use such a term in this very exclusive area!

Cleveland Row
Cleveland Row, houses dating from 1693-1700
Houses in Cleveland Row
Houses in Cleveland Row

Heading towards St James’s Street there is an opening on the left to Russell Court, and a cobbled courtyard with stables dating from the 1790s, and clearly connected to the grand mansions.

Entrance to Russell Court
Entrance to Russell Court
Stables in Russell co
Stables in Russell Court

And I noticed a curious area on the map, Blue Ball Yard. This is the rear of the Stafford Hotel, whose entrance is in St James’ Place and which can be accessed from Green Park via this curious little passage under the buildings.

The passageway to St James's Place, under the buildings
The passageway to St James’s Place, under the buildings
The Stafford Hotel, St James's Place
The Stafford Hotel, St James’s Place
The American Bar of The Stafford Hotel, Blue Ball Yard
The American Bar of The Stafford Hotel, Blue Ball Yard

And also in St James’s Place – 

DSCF7704

Another quiet and fascinating few hours, away from the tourists, but too hot to continue!

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