Wellington in the Cape Province

We landed early in Cape Town and were in Wellington in time for early morning coffee at The Perfect Place.

The town has had several names: ‘Limiet Valley’, ‘The Wagonmakers’ Valley’, ‘Val du Charron’, and finally, after 1840, ‘Wellington’ in memory of the Duke’s victory over Napoleon. It had been a 12-hour flight from the UK and we stretched our legs with a wander round the town.

Malan Street, Wellington
Malan Street, Wellington
On the corner of Bain Street, Wellington
On the corner of Bain Street, Wellington
Bain Street, Wellington
Bain Street, Wellington
34 Bain Street, Wellington
34 Bain Street, Wellington
On a house in Bain Street, Wellington
On a house in Bain Street, Wellington

Hugo’s Jam Factory stood in Bain Street, as did the Dietmann Piano Factorybut the buildings have now been converted into residential apartments.

Hugo's old Jam Factory in Bain Street, Wellington
Hugo’s old Jam Factory in Bain Street, Wellington

I saw some curious succulents…

…And vibrant colours.

Jacaranda flowering in Wellington
Jacaranda flowering in Wellington
Frangipane flowering in Wellington
Frangipane flowering in Wellington

We noticed the Town Hall and lingered at the Dutch Reformed Church where building started in 1838 and continued to the end of the century. This is where Andrew Murray is buried.

The Town Hall, Wellington
The Town Hall, Wellington
The Dutch Reformed Church in Wellington
The Dutch Reformed Church in Wellington
The Dutch Reformed Church in Wellington
The Dutch Reformed Church in Wellington

And then it was time to set off for Tulbagh, via Bain’s Kloof Pass.

Further information
Places & buildings in Wellington

4 comments

  1. Tulbagh was one of the very early settlements in the Cape and as such historically interesting. I knew that it was also very beautiful. We wanted to start the journey somewhere quiet and not too far to drive on the first day – the 12-hour flight is quite demanding. Cape Town is both beautiful and of course historic, but I live in London and I know that a big city, or a capital city, doesn’t always reflect the ‘original’ or ‘authentic’ character of the country. In planning the route in SA I was interested in the history of the country, the scenery, and the particular characteristics of the stopping points. The Garden Route is of course scenically dramatic, but I feel SA has much more to offer than the coastline. I too did not explore all these areas when I lived in SA so being able to do so now is a joy!

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  2. Thanks for the email about your SA travels Candy – unfortunately you gave me an incorrect URL but I managed to track you down! I may have missed something from previous posts, but why did you begin your trip in Wellington? A nice place, but not the normal tourist spot. I shall try and catch up with the rest of the journey in due course 🙂
    Jude xx

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    • Oh sorry – not good. We flew into Cape Town and needed a leg stretch after the flight. I didn’t know Wellington and it seemed like a good idea from what I read on the internet. It was also on the way to Tulbagh…

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      • and the reason you went to Tulbagh was? I’m just inquisitive because most people visiting SA stick to the larger cities or the Garden Route. I wish I’d explored more when I lived there, but most of these places were just towns we passed through en route to somewhere else.

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