The Palaces in Florence

Renaissance Florence was politically and economically extraordinarily powerful and the ruling élite built suitably grand homes for themselves in the centre of the City.

The Strozzi Palace was built in the 15C for Filippo Strozzi the Elder, a political rival to the Medicis. The Palace was intended to underline the family’s status and power, and it certainly achieves that. The family also endowed the Strozzi Chapel in Santa Maria Novella.

The Strozzi Palace
The Strozzi Palace (middle distance)
The Strozzi Palace
The Strozzi Palace

The Corsini Palace facing the River Arno was built in the 17C-18C with almost unbelievable opulence. It is still privately owned.

The Palazzo Corsini
The Palazzo Corsini
The Palazzo Corsini
The Palazzo Corsini

The Davanzati Palace dates to the 14C and was built and occupied by various wealthy merchant families.

The Davanzati Palace
The Davanzati Palace
The Davanzati Palace, coat of arms
The Davanzati Palace, coat of arms

Building work on the Antinori Palace started in the 15C and a member of the family still lives in the building. It dates to the time of Lorenzo the Magnificent and a time when Florence was a political and economic powerhouse.

The Antinori Palace
The Antinori Palace

The Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni was built in the 16C and is now in private ownership.

The Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni
The Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni
The Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni
The Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni

The Rucellai family were powerful bankers in Florence and their ‘work-live’ home reflects this power and wealth.

The Rucellai Palace
The Rucellai Palace
The Rucellai Palace
The Rucellai Palace

The Spini Ferroni Palace was built in the 13C for wealthy bankers, and is now home to Ferragamo – in the basement.

The Spini Ferroni Palace
The Spini Feroni Palace
The facade of the Spini Feroni Palace
The facade of the Spini Feroni Palace
The Spini Ferroni Palace entrance
The Spini Ferroni Palace entrance

There are many more of these wonderful 15C buildings in Florence, all demonstrating the wealth and power of the City in the Renaissance.

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