Travel in France – Vezenobres

On Day 16 of Travel in France we took a break from countryside walking and visited Uzès and Vézénobres.

Vézénobres is a village perché, balanced on top of a hill overlooking the Gardon River. The town was an outlying stronghold, originally built to protect Nîmes. As a Mediaeval town it was guarded by five gates, each with a drawbridge and guarded by one family. At the top of the hill stood a chateau or fort, now barely discernable, and the northern gate, the Fort Gate or The Gate of the Wind.

The Fort at the top of Vezenobres
The ruins of the Fort at the top of Vezenobres
Views from The Fort, Vezenobres
Views from The Fort, Vezenobres
Views from The Fort, Vezenobres
Views from The Fort, Vezenobres

The next gate, on the south east, was the Viterne Gate, but this was demolished in 1860. We entered into the city via a passageway under the Chateau de Girard, 14C – the Rue du Porche.

One of the gates into Vezonobres
The passageway under the Chateau Girard

The passageway leads out to the square in the centre of the town, with the Chateau on the left, now the Hotel de Ville.

Lunchtime in the central square in Vezonobres
Lunchtime in the central square in Vezenobres

Just below the square is the eastern gate, The Sabran Gate, the only remaining fortified gate from the Mediaeval period. 

The Sabran Gate
The Sabran Gate
The Sabran Gate from the outside
The Sabran Gate from the outside

The Chateau of Montanégre, also called the Chateau of Fay-Pairaut, was associated with the Bourgoule Gate. 

The Fay-Pairaut Chateau

The Chateau Fay Peraut and views over the plain
The Chateau Fay Peraut and views over the plain
The Bourgoule Gate?
The Bourgoule Gate?

I couldn’t find information about the fifth gate, the westerly Alais Gate.

This contemporary seating was rather beautiful.


The town was famous for its dried figs in the Middle Ages and recently this tradition has been revived, with a biannual Fig Festival. I could only find these flowers.

The Régordane Waya trade, military, and pilgrim route from (originally) the Île de France to Saint Gilles du Gard and the Mediterranean, passes through the town and is now the GR700. The road was originally built by the Romans.

Regordane Way

We should have lingered – there was so much more to see and to understand, particularly the history of the town during the Wars of Religion. But we were tired so returned to the gîte and a chilly swimming pool for refreshment.

IMG_9762

It was a time of a very full moon.

IMG_9769

 

You may be interested in
An article on Vezenobres, with interesting photographs
The Régordane Way
Photographs of the town
An interesting brochure on the Gard
Walks and hikes around the Pont du Gard

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